Speech API – Speech Recognition, Google Cloud Platform, text to speech free.#Text #to #speech #free

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Cloud Speech API

Powerful Speech Recognition

Google Cloud Speech API enables developers to convert audio to text by applying powerful neural network models in an easy to use API. The API recognizes over 110 languages and variants, to support your global user base. You can transcribe the text of users dictating to an application’s microphone, enable command-and-control through voice, or transcribe audio files, among many other use cases. Recognize audio uploaded in the request, and integrate with your audio storage on Google Cloud Storage, by using the same technology Google uses to power its own products.

Text to speech free

Powered by Machine Learning

Apply the most advanced deep learning neural network algorithms to your user’s audio for speech recognition with unparalleled accuracy. Speech API accuracy improves over time as Google improves the internal speech recognition technology used by Google products.

Text to speech free

Over 110 Languages

Speech API recognizes over 110 languages and variants to support your global user base. You can also filter inappropriate content in text results.

Text to speech free

Return Text Results in Real-Time

Speech API can stream text results, returning partial recognition results as they become available, with the recognized text appearing immediately while speaking. Alternatively, Speech API can return recognized text from audio stored in a file.

Text to speech free

Accurate in Noisy Environments

You don’t need advanced signal processing or noise cancellation before sending audio to Speech API. The service can successfully handle noisy audio from a variety of environments.

Text to speech free

Context-Aware Recognition

Speech recognition can be tailored to context by providing a separate set of word hints with each API call. Useful especially for device/app control use cases.

Text to speech free

Works With Apps Across Any Device

Speech API supports any device that can send a REST or gRPC request including phones, PCs, tablets and IoT devices (e.g., cars, TVs, speakers)

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Speech API Features

Speech to text conversion powered by machine learning

CLOUD SPEECH API PRICING

Powerful Speech Recognition

Cloud Speech API is priced per 15 seconds of audio processed after a 60 minute free tier. For details, please see our pricing guide.


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ISpeech – Text to Speech on the App Store, text to speech free.#Text #to #speech

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iSpeech – Text to Speech

This app is only available on the App Store for iOS devices.

***Best Free Text to Speech App***

*Millions of Downloads

*Updated 2017 with latest technology

*All Major Languages

*Save Frequent Phrases

*Just Pay for Voices

Type in text or copy and paste and listen with human quality text to speech. iSpeech converts text to

speech with the best sounding voices anywhere. Simply enter any text and iSpeech will instantly read the words.

software as a service (SaaS) API.

Check out the free API at http://www.ispeech.org/api

What’s New in Version 1.5.0

– Added a swipe down to dismiss keyboard gesture

– Bug fixes (including Crash)

Screenshots

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Customer Reviews

Be aware of unwanted charges

This app will prompt you to purchase additional languages every time you open the app. And if you are not careful you will end up buying language that you didn’t want. I installed the app today and found that I was charged 3 dollars for Italian language. I don’t know Italian and had no idea when/how I purchased it. Then I realized I probably clicked yes on one of the pop up question. This app constantly shows pop up questions. If you want to use it, pay extra attention. I deleted the app tonight and will not use it again.

Get ready to lose money

As pointed out by others, you have to be VERY careful when using this app, because you’ll receive a pop up every time you use it that prompts you to buy new voices for $3.99 a piece. I have deleted this free app and will never use it again because it made me buy an additional English voice I had no intention of getting.

Love this app!

I can’t believe how good this app is! They finally fixed it. Thank you so much developer!

It used to crash after latest iOS update, but now it’s good. Has more languages than any other TTS app. The quality is second to none. Amazing! Thanks!

Customers Also Bought

Text to speech free


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Read Text Out Loud with Verbose Text to Speech Software, text to speech free.#Text #to

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Verbose Text to Speech Software

With Verbose text reading software, you can have Verbose read the current text on your screen out loud with the simple press of a button by setting up system-wide hotkeys.

Alternatively, use Verbose text to voice software to save your text documents or emails to mp3 audio files for your mobile phone, iPod or mp3 player, so you can listen to them on the go.

After you’ve saved your spoken text to mp3 or wav, you can add further vocal effects and create a variety of character voices with Voxal Voice Changing Software.

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Screen Reader Applications
  • Save email text to mp3 to review away from the office
  • Relax while your PC reads long documents to you
  • Use voice synthesis to create prompts for interactive voice response systems
  • Listen to an ebook on your way to work
  • Study for exams by listening to your notes
  • Proofread by having your writing read back to you
  • Convert doc to mp3 to take reading with you on your daily walk or run
  • Great for people with low vision, or reading disabilities
  • Save audio for computer voice announcement systems
Text to Speech Features
  • Reads text using text to speech technology
  • Save speech as compressed mp3 files
  • Burn mp3s to CD with a direct link to Express Burn CD Burner
  • Change voice characteristics setting to change speed, pitch and volume
  • Read text from Internet Explorer, Word, Outlook and other text-based programs
  • Install new speech engine reading voices
  • Set mp3 and wav encoding options
  • Customize hotkeys to read text from any program
  • Edit wav or mp3 files with WavePad Audio Editor
System Requirements
  • Windows XP/Vista/7/8/8.1/10
  • Works on 64 bit Windows
  • For earlier versions see Windows 98 or Windows 2000
  • One or more text-to-speech engines

(included with Windows by default)


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5 Best Free Text to Speech Software, text to speech free.#Text #to #speech #free

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5 Best Free Text to Speech Software

There are many free text to speech software available in the market. Most of these software work almost the same way basically convert to speech. They differ in the type of documents that they support, and in ease of conversion from text to speech. Some free text to speech are directly integrated in your computer, and you can basically use them to read out any text. For others, you need to sometimes specify the document, or provide exact text that you want to convert.

Text to speech free

Here is a list of 5 Best Free Text to Speech Software:

1) NaturalReader Free Read Text with a Hotkey

NaturalReader Free is one of the best free text to speech software. To hear any text, just select the text and press your selected hotkey NaturalReader will immediately start reading it for you. Extremely easy to use.

Read More Here. Download Here.[subscribe-to-us]

2) iSpeech Free Convert Text to Speech Online

iSpeech Free is a free web based text to speech service. You do not have to download or install anything. Just copy paste the text you want to be converted, or you can even upload a document. iSpeech will convert that to text for you. Completely Free.

3) ReadPlease Read Text from Clipboard

ReadPlease is another free and easy to use text to speech software. You can download it, and paste any text that you want it to read. Apart from that, ReadPlease can also read the text from your clipboard.

Read More Here. Download Here.

4) eSpeak Free Text to Speech for Foreign Languages

eSpeak is another free text to speech software. What sets eSpeak apart is that it supports many foreign languages, like, like Afrikaans, Albanian, Armenian, Cantonese, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Kurdish, Latvian, Mandarin, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish, Tamil, Turkish, Vietnamese, Welsh.

Read more Here. Download Here.

5) DSpeech Free Text to Speech Software

Dspeech is another free text to speech software. It easily converts text to speech, and lets you save them as audio files. This is a simple no frills attached Text to Speech Software.

Read More Here. Download Here.

All the free text to speech software mentioned above are really good, and extremely easy to use. Try them out to see which one works for you best.


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Speech API – Speech Recognition, Google Cloud Platform, text to speech free.#Text #to #speech #free

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Cloud Speech API

Powerful Speech Recognition

Google Cloud Speech API enables developers to convert audio to text by applying powerful neural network models in an easy to use API. The API recognizes over 110 languages and variants, to support your global user base. You can transcribe the text of users dictating to an application’s microphone, enable command-and-control through voice, or transcribe audio files, among many other use cases. Recognize audio uploaded in the request, and integrate with your audio storage on Google Cloud Storage, by using the same technology Google uses to power its own products.

Text to speech free

Powered by Machine Learning

Apply the most advanced deep learning neural network algorithms to your user’s audio for speech recognition with unparalleled accuracy. Speech API accuracy improves over time as Google improves the internal speech recognition technology used by Google products.

Text to speech free

Over 110 Languages

Speech API recognizes over 110 languages and variants to support your global user base. You can also filter inappropriate content in text results.

Text to speech free

Return Text Results in Real-Time

Speech API can stream text results, returning partial recognition results as they become available, with the recognized text appearing immediately while speaking. Alternatively, Speech API can return recognized text from audio stored in a file.

Text to speech free

Accurate in Noisy Environments

You don’t need advanced signal processing or noise cancellation before sending audio to Speech API. The service can successfully handle noisy audio from a variety of environments.

Text to speech free

Context-Aware Recognition

Speech recognition can be tailored to context by providing a separate set of word hints with each API call. Useful especially for device/app control use cases.

Text to speech free

Works With Apps Across Any Device

Speech API supports any device that can send a REST or gRPC request including phones, PCs, tablets and IoT devices (e.g., cars, TVs, speakers)

Text to speech free

Text to speech free

Speech API Features

Speech to text conversion powered by machine learning

CLOUD SPEECH API PRICING

Powerful Speech Recognition

Cloud Speech API is priced per 15 seconds of audio processed after a 60 minute free tier. For details, please see our pricing guide.


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Top 5 Free Text To Speech Online Programs, text to speech free.#Text #to #speech #free

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Top 5 Free Text To Speech Online Programs

Nowadays, more and more people use text-to-speech (TTS) technology to improve their reading efficiency and save time. But, for newbie computer users, it’s too complicated to download and install various software, including speech engines and voices. Fortunately, there are many websites supply free online speech synthesis services without any software download and installation. The following recommendations are the top five sites with lots of unique features.

1. AT T Labs Natural Voices Text-to-Speech Demo

Text to speech freeThe AT T labs official text to speech demo is the best online program to experience and use the famous high-quality human sounding AT T Natural Voices for free. And the demo is very easy to use. The whole process contains only few simple steps.

Text to speech free

Brief Instructions: Enter the desired text (255 characters is max) and select a voice from the list. Then click the “Submit” button and a WAV audio file will be generated for you to download.

Voice List (10 voices of 2 languages):

Mike – American English

Crystal – American English

Claire – American English

Julia – American English

Lauren – American English

Mel – American English

Ray – American English

Rich – American English

2. imTranslator Text-to-Speech Utility

Text to speech freeThe Text-to-Speech section of the imTranslator website supplies a text-to-speech utility with animated speaking characters. This program will read the text in the most realistic, human-sounding way in a variety of languages: English U.S., Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian and European Spanish.

Text to speech free

The imTranslator Text-to-Speech Utility allows you to:

  • Get best quality voice and pronunciation.
  • Hear any text in the language you are learning.
  • Practice your speaking and listening skills.
  • Realistic animated speaking characters personalize your language experience.
  • Use audio player functions to replay text as many times as you wish.

Additionally, you may adjust the speed of the speech if the default speed doesn’t fit you. The reading word will be highlighted automatically while playback.

NOTE: don’t click the text area while playback, otherwise the playback will stop immediately. The service can speak up to 1000 characters at one time. The surplus text will be trimmed!

Another exciting feature of this utility is Virtual Keyboard that allows multilingual text input in most popular languages.

For webmasters, imTranslator allows you to add TTS functionality to your website. To incorporate the TTS Voice to your website, just copy several lines of HTML code and paste it into your web page. And there are four styles (floating button, iframe, link, banner) available.

3. iSpeech Text-to-Speech Demo

Text to speech freeListen to anything you used to read with iSpeech text to speech (TTS). There is no software required because iSpeech is a software as a service. That means you don’t have anything to install or any bloat-ware, malware or spyware risk. You simply enter the text or upload the document you would like to convert to speech.

Text to speech free

The quick start demo on the home page is easy enough. Just enter some text and play! Now anyone can listen to any text content with minimal effort, no software installation and no technical expertise.

Besides the easy demo, iSpeech also supplies a more powerful and complex text to speech service for registered users (the registration is free). This advanced text to speech service allows you convert text directly or upload files of various formats to convert.

Text to speech free

Simply cut and paste the text you wish to convert to speech into the text box and click convert text. You may choose one of the follwing voices first. The speed of the speech can also be adjusted to your liking.

Voice List (13 voices of 7 languages):


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Text of President Obama’s Speech in Hiroshima, Japan #free #voip

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#text to speech free

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The New York Times

Text of President Obama’s Speech in Hiroshima, Japan

Doug Mills / The New York Times

May 27, 2016

The following is a transcript of President Obama ’s speech in Hiroshima, Japan. as recorded by The New York Times.

Seventy-one years ago, on a bright cloudless morning, death fell from the sky and the world was changed. A flash of light and a wall of fire destroyed a city and demonstrated that mankind possessed the means to destroy itself.

Why do we come to this place, to Hiroshima? We come to ponder a terrible force unleashed in a not-so-distant past. We come to mourn the dead, including over 100,000 Japanese men, women and children, thousands of Koreans, a dozen Americans held prisoner.

Their souls speak to us. They ask us to look inward, to take stock of who we are and what we might become.

It is not the fact of war that sets Hiroshima apart. Artifacts tell us that violent conflict appeared with the very first man. Our early ancestors having learned to make blades from flint and spears from wood used these tools not just for hunting but against their own kind. On every continent, the history of civilization is filled with war, whether driven by scarcity of grain or hunger for gold, compelled by nationalist fervor or religious zeal. Empires have risen and fallen. Peoples have been subjugated and liberated. And at each juncture, innocents have suffered, a countless toll, their names forgotten by time.

The world war that reached its brutal end in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was fought among the wealthiest and most powerful of nations. Their civilizations had given the world great cities and magnificent art. Their thinkers had advanced ideas of justice and harmony and truth. And yet the war grew out of the same base instinct for domination or conquest that had caused conflicts among the simplest tribes, an old pattern amplified by new capabilities and without new constraints.

In the span of a few years, some 60 million people would die. Men, women, children, no different than us. Shot, beaten, marched, bombed, jailed, starved, gassed to death. There are many sites around the world that chronicle this war, memorials that tell stories of courage and heroism, graves and empty camps that echo of unspeakable depravity.

Yet in the image of a mushroom cloud that rose into these skies, we are most starkly reminded of humanity’s core contradiction. How the very spark that marks us as a species, our thoughts, our imagination, our language, our toolmaking, our ability to set ourselves apart from nature and bend it to our will — those very things also give us the capacity for unmatched destruction.

How often does material advancement or social innovation blind us to this truth? How easily we learn to justify violence in the name of some higher cause.

Every great religion promises a pathway to love and peace and righteousness, and yet no religion has been spared from believers who have claimed their faith as a license to kill.

Nations arise telling a story that binds people together in sacrifice and cooperation, allowing for remarkable feats. But those same stories have so often been used to oppress and dehumanize those who are different.

Science allows us to communicate across the seas and fly above the clouds, to cure disease and understand the cosmos, but those same discoveries can be turned into ever more efficient killing machines.

The wars of the modern age teach us this truth. Hiroshima teaches this truth. Technological progress without an equivalent progress in human institutions can doom us. The scientific revolution that led to the splitting of an atom requires a moral revolution as well.

That is why we come to this place. We stand here in the middle of this city and force ourselves to imagine the moment the bomb fell. We force ourselves to feel the dread of children confused by what they see. We listen to a silent cry. We remember all the innocents killed across the arc of that terrible war and the wars that came before and the wars that would follow.

Mere words cannot give voice to such suffering. But we have a shared responsibility to look directly into the eye of history and ask what we must do differently to curb such suffering again.

Some day, the voices of the hibakusha will no longer be with us to bear witness. But the memory of the morning of Aug. 6, 1945, must never fade. That memory allows us to fight complacency. It fuels our moral imagination. It allows us to change.

And since that fateful day, we have made choices that give us hope. The United States and Japan have forged not only an alliance but a friendship that has won far more for our people than we could ever claim through war. The nations of Europe built a union that replaced battlefields with bonds of commerce and democracy. Oppressed people and nations won liberation. An international community established institutions and treaties that work to avoid war and aspire to restrict and roll back and ultimately eliminate the existence of nuclear weapons.

Still, every act of aggression between nations, every act of terror and corruption and cruelty and oppression that we see around the world shows our work is never done. We may not be able to eliminate man’s capacity to do evil, so nations and the alliances that we form must possess the means to defend ourselves. But among those nations like my own that hold nuclear stockpiles, we must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without them.

We may not realize this goal in my lifetime, but persistent effort can roll back the possibility of catastrophe. We can chart a course that leads to the destruction of these stockpiles. We can stop the spread to new nations and secure deadly materials from fanatics.

And yet that is not enough. For we see around the world today how even the crudest rifles and barrel bombs can serve up violence on a terrible scale. We must change our mind-set about war itself. To prevent conflict through diplomacy and strive to end conflicts after they’ve begun. To see our growing interdependence as a cause for peaceful cooperation and not violent competition. To define our nations not by our capacity to destroy but by what we build. And perhaps, above all, we must reimagine our connection to one another as members of one human race.

For this, too, is what makes our species unique. We’re not bound by genetic code to repeat the mistakes of the past. We can learn. We can choose. We can tell our children a different story, one that describes a common humanity, one that makes war less likely and cruelty less easily accepted.

We see these stories in the hibakusha. The woman who forgave a pilot who flew the plane that dropped the atomic bomb because she recognized that what she really hated was war itself. The man who sought out families of Americans killed here because he believed their loss was equal to his own.

My own nation’s story began with simple words: All men are created equal and endowed by our creator with certain unalienable rights including life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Realizing that ideal has never been easy, even within our own borders, even among our own citizens. But staying true to that story is worth the effort. It is an ideal to be strived for, an ideal that extends across continents and across oceans. The irreducible worth of every person, the insistence that every life is precious, the radical and necessary notion that we are part of a single human family — that is the story that we all must tell.

That is why we come to Hiroshima. So that we might think of people we love. The first smile from our children in the morning. The gentle touch from a spouse over the kitchen table. The comforting embrace of a parent. We can think of those things and know that those same precious moments took place here, 71 years ago.

Those who died, they are like us. Ordinary people understand this, I think. They do not want more war. They would rather that the wonders of science be focused on improving life and not eliminating it. When the choices made by nations, when the choices made by leaders, reflect this simple wisdom, then the lesson of Hiroshima is done.

The world was forever changed here, but today the children of this city will go through their day in peace. What a precious thing that is. It is worth protecting, and then extending to every child. That is a future we can choose, a future in which Hiroshima and Nagasaki are known not as the dawn of atomic warfare but as the start of our own moral awakening.

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Transcript: JFK s Speech on His Religion: NPR #free #slots

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#text to speech free

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Transcript: JFK’s Speech on His Religion

On Sept. 12, 1960, presidential candidate John F. Kennedy gave a major speech to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association, a group of Protestant ministers, on the issue of his religion. At the time, many Protestants questioned whether Kennedy’s Roman Catholic faith would allow him to make important national decisions as president independent of the church. Kennedy addressed those concerns before a skeptical audience of Protestant clergy. The following is a transcript of Kennedy’s speech:

Kennedy: Rev. Meza, Rev. Reck, I’m grateful for your generous invitation to speak my views.

While the so-called religious issue is necessarily and properly the chief topic here tonight, I want to emphasize from the outset that we have far more critical issues to face in the 1960 election: the spread of Communist influence, until it now festers 90 miles off the coast of Florida; the humiliating treatment of our president and vice president by those who no longer respect our power; the hungry children I saw in West Virginia; the old people who cannot pay their doctor bills; the families forced to give up their farms; an America with too many slums, with too few schools, and too late to the moon and outer space.

These are the real issues which should decide this campaign. And they are not religious issues — for war and hunger and ignorance and despair know no religious barriers.

But because I am a Catholic, and no Catholic has ever been elected president, the real issues in this campaign have been obscured — perhaps deliberately, in some quarters less responsible than this. So it is apparently necessary for me to state once again not what kind of church I believe in — for that should be important only to me — but what kind of America I believe in.

I believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute, where no Catholic prelate would tell the president (should he be Catholic) how to act, and no Protestant minister would tell his parishioners for whom to vote; where no church or church school is granted any public funds or political preference; and where no man is denied public office merely because his religion differs from the president who might appoint him or the people who might elect him.

I believe in an America that is officially neither Catholic, Protestant nor Jewish; where no public official either requests or accepts instructions on public policy from the Pope, the National Council of Churches or any other ecclesiastical source; where no religious body seeks to impose its will directly or indirectly upon the general populace or the public acts of its officials; and where religious liberty is so indivisible that an act against one church is treated as an act against all.

For while this year it may be a Catholic against whom the finger of suspicion is pointed, in other years it has been, and may someday be again, a Jew or a Quaker or a Unitarian or a Baptist. It was Virginia’s harassment of Baptist preachers, for example, that helped lead to Jefferson’s statute of religious freedom. Today I may be the victim, but tomorrow it may be you — until the whole fabric of our harmonious society is ripped at a time of great national peril.

Finally, I believe in an America where religious intolerance will someday end; where all men and all churches are treated as equal; where every man has the same right to attend or not attend the church of his choice; where there is no Catholic vote, no anti-Catholic vote, no bloc voting of any kind; and where Catholics, Protestants and Jews, at both the lay and pastoral level, will refrain from those attitudes of disdain and division which have so often marred their works in the past, and promote instead the American ideal of brotherhood.

That is the kind of America in which I believe. And it represents the kind of presidency in which I believe — a great office that must neither be humbled by making it the instrument of any one religious group, nor tarnished by arbitrarily withholding its occupancy from the members of any one religious group. I believe in a president whose religious views are his own private affair, neither imposed by him upon the nation, or imposed by the nation upon him as a condition to holding that office.

I would not look with favor upon a president working to subvert the First Amendment’s guarantees of religious liberty. Nor would our system of checks and balances permit him to do so. And neither do I look with favor upon those who would work to subvert Article VI of the Constitution by requiring a religious test — even by indirection — for it. If they disagree with that safeguard, they should be out openly working to repeal it.

I want a chief executive whose public acts are responsible to all groups and obligated to none; who can attend any ceremony, service or dinner his office may appropriately require of him; and whose fulfillment of his presidential oath is not limited or conditioned by any religious oath, ritual or obligation.

This is the kind of America I believe in, and this is the kind I fought for in the South Pacific, and the kind my brother died for in Europe. No one suggested then that we may have a “divided loyalty,” that we did “not believe in liberty,” or that we belonged to a disloyal group that threatened the “freedoms for which our forefathers died.”

And in fact ,this is the kind of America for which our forefathers died, when they fled here to escape religious test oaths that denied office to members of less favored churches; when they fought for the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom; and when they fought at the shrine I visited today, the Alamo. For side by side with Bowie and Crockett died McCafferty and Bailey and Carey. But no one knows whether they were Catholic or not, for there was no religious test at the Alamo.

I ask you tonight to follow in that tradition, to judge me on the basis of my record of 14 years in Congress, on my declared stands against an ambassador to the Vatican, against unconstitutional aid to parochial schools, and against any boycott of the public schools (which I have attended myself) instead of judging me on the basis of these pamphlets and publications we all have seen that carefully select quotations out of context from the statements of Catholic church leaders, usually in other countries, frequently in other centuries, and always omitting, of course, the statement of the American Bishops in 1948, which strongly endorsed church-state separation, and which more nearly reflects the views of almost every American Catholic.

I do not consider these other quotations binding upon my public acts. Why should you? But let me say, with respect to other countries, that I am wholly opposed to the state being used by any religious group, Catholic or Protestant, to compel, prohibit, or persecute the free exercise of any other religion. And I hope that you and I condemn with equal fervor those nations which deny their presidency to Protestants, and those which deny it to Catholics. And rather than cite the misdeeds of those who differ, I would cite the record of the Catholic Church in such nations as Ireland and France, and the independence of such statesmen as Adenauer and De Gaulle.

But let me stress again that these are my views. For contrary to common newspaper usage, I am not the Catholic candidate for president. I am the Democratic Party’s candidate for president, who happens also to be a Catholic. I do not speak for my church on public matters, and the church does not speak for me.

Whatever issue may come before me as president — on birth control, divorce, censorship, gambling or any other subject — I will make my decision in accordance with these views, in accordance with what my conscience tells me to be the national interest, and without regard to outside religious pressures or dictates. And no power or threat of punishment could cause me to decide otherwise.

But if the time should ever come — and I do not concede any conflict to be even remotely possible — when my office would require me to either violate my conscience or violate the national interest, then I would resign the office; and I hope any conscientious public servant would do the same.

But I do not intend to apologize for these views to my critics of either Catholic or Protestant faith, nor do I intend to disavow either my views or my church in order to win this election.

If I should lose on the real issues, I shall return to my seat in the Senate, satisfied that I had tried my best and was fairly judged. But if this election is decided on the basis that 40 million Americans lost their chance of being president on the day they were baptized, then it is the whole nation that will be the loser — in the eyes of Catholics and non-Catholics around the world, in the eyes of history, and in the eyes of our own people.

But if, on the other hand, I should win the election, then I shall devote every effort of mind and spirit to fulfilling the oath of the presidency — practically identical, I might add, to the oath I have taken for 14 years in the Congress. For without reservation, I can “solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of president of the United States, and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution, so help me God.

Transcript courtesy of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.


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Graduate Program in Speech Language Pathology #slp, #speech #language #pathology, #graduate, #distance #learning, #communication #disorders

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Graduate Program in Speech Language Pathology

We are pleased to be able to offer this program in three different formats: residential (on-campus), distance learning – worldwide (full-time), and distance learning worldwide (part-time). The information contained within this page is the same for all formats. The requirements are the same for all formats. The two distance learning formats offer all academic content online with the clinical portions requiring presence on-site. For more information regarding each format of the graduate program click on the relevant links found on the right side of this page.

PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Click here for detailed information regarding admission requirements, prerequisite coursework, and how to apply.

GRADUATE CURRICULUM

The graduate program in Speech Language Pathology is 60 course credits in total. Following are the required courses to complete the graduate program in Speech Language Pathology effective Fall 2014. WKU reserves the right to modify these requirements as necessary.

Core Curriculum (40-43 credit hours; all courses are 3 credit hours except where noted)

SLP 500 Research Methodology in CSD

SLP 501 Early Intervention in Speech Language Pathology

SLP 502 Motor Speech Disorders

SLP 504 Seminar in Child Language

SLP 506 Dysfluency

SLP 507 Aphasia

SLP 508 Voice Disorders

SLP 509 Speech Science

SLP 511 Neurology for Speech and Language

SLP 512 Seminar in Phonology

SLP 513 Cognitive Linguistic Disorders

SLP 514 Dysphagia

SLP 515 Rehab Audiology

*SLP 518 Advanced AAC (Alternative and Augmentative Communication Modalities) – if a student demonstrates competency in this area from an undergraduate course then the student is not required to complete this course but must complete a 3 credit elective in place of this course

SLP 579 Professional Issues (1 credit hour)

Clinical Courses (8 credit hours) – Click on Clinical Internship and Clinical Externship links in the right column for more information

SLP 588 Clinical Methods in Speech-Language Pathology (1 credit hour. This course is required of all students in distance learning formats; this course is not required of residential students)

SLP 590 Clinical Internship (1 credit hour. Residential students will enroll in SLP 590 twice while distance students will enroll in SLP 590 once.)

SLP 591 Clinical Externship (will enroll 3 times at 2 credit hours each or 2 times at 3 credit hours each)

Approved Electives (9-12 credit hours must be completed)

Transferring Graduate Credits

STATE LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATION

Upon graduation, students will be eligible to apply for the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC). Most settings require the CCC and it is considered the gold standard for employment in speech-language pathology. All states require a license to practice. The state license may be in addition to the CCC. Some states also require teacher certification to work in the schools.

Eligibility for teacher certification is not available as part of the Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Program at WKU. Consequently, students graduating from the Master’s program after September 1, 2014 are not eligible for teacher certification in Kentucky. Speech-language pathologists do not need teacher certification to work in Kentucky schools although some districts prefer it.

Students seeking school-based employment in states other than Kentucky should determine if their potential out-of-state employer requires teacher certification eligibility in Kentucky. Some states require that teacher certification applicants be eligible for certification in the state from which the Master’s degree was earned. Some states just require that applicants be eligible for the ASHA CCC, while other states do not offer teacher certification for speech-language pathologists. Because of the array of requirements across the country, potential students should decide if the WKU graduate program would meet their needs based on the requirements where employment may be sought. Individual state requirements may be viewed at: http://www.asha.org/advocacy/state/info/

ADDITIONAL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Summative Assessment: Summative evaluations are required by The Graduate School and our accrediting agency. This department uses the PRAXIS exam as the summative evaluation. Students must take and pass the PRAXIS exam in Speech-Language Pathology. The passing score is 162 and meets the ASHA requirement for certification. Effective August 2009, the PRAXIS exam can only be taken during the last semester of the graduate program. PRAXIS exams taken before this period will not be accepted as the summative evaluation required for graduation. Students who do not pass the PRAXIS exam must enroll in a matriculation course until the successfully passing the exam. The last 4 months is defined as:

  • If graduating in Spring: January 15 – May 15
  • If graduating in Summer: April 15 – August 15
  • If graduating in Fall: August 15 – December 15

For students who are going to graduate in May 2017, Please select 0108 as the WKU code for the PRAXIS!

Final Portfolio: Each student will complete a portfolio during the last semester of coursework. The portfolio is comprised of clinical goal statements and reflection statements completed throughout the clinical experiences.

Clinical Hours: A minimum of 400 clinical hours are required in order to graduate. See Clinical Internship and Externship links to the right of this page for additional information.

Knowledge and Skills Acquisition: All students must demonstrate that they are competent in the knowledge and skills as defined by the 2014 ASHA Standards. This will be measured by instructors and supervisors throughout the program. The competencies will be kept in a database called CALIPSO that students will be able to access and track as they complete. CALIPSO is a website that will also track additional information required during the graduate program. There is a one time student access fee of $85.

Forms: The following forms are required by The Graduate School during your course of study:

Program of Study: This program form for Master’s level students details your plan of study. The Graduate School checks this against what you have completed before you can graduate. The form must be completed with your advisor prior to completion of 12 credit hours.

Application for Graduation. Due after completion of 18 hours coursework.

Comprehensive Exam/Capstone Completion: Due during the last semester once the PRAXIS examination has been completed. Completed by student advisor.

The Department will not issue letters or sign forms stating a student has completed the program until the diploma is awarded by Western Kentucky University.

COMPUTER SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

The Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at WKU uses Adobe Connect Pro for most (if not all) of the on-line courses and web-enhanced courses. To be able to participate fully in these classes students should have the following computer hardware and software, along with DSL/Cable/or T1 internet connection (dial-up service is not acceptable) at a minimum:

Minimum Technology Requirements

Windows Operating System

  • 1.4GHz Intel® Pentium® 4 or faster processor (or equivalent) for Microsoft® Windows® XP, Windows 7 or Windows 8; 2GHz Pentium 4 or faster processor (or equivalent) for Windows Vista®
  • Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8
  • 512MB of RAM (1GB recommended) for Windows XP, Windows 7 or Windows 8; 1GB of RAM (2GB recommended) for Windows Vista
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7, 8, 9, 10; Mozilla Firefox; Google Chrome
  • Adobe® Flash® Player 10.3

Mac Operating System

  • 1.83GHz Intel Core Duo or faster processor
  • 512MB of RAM (1GB recommended)
  • Mac OS X, 10.5, 10.6, 10.7.4, 10.8
  • No Adobe Connect Add-in support for Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard). Users on Leopard can attend meetings in the browser.*
  • Mozilla Firefox; Apple Safari; Google Chrome
  • Adobe Flash Player 10.3

More Information for Different Formats of Graduate Program – Please read all information to the left before proceeding to one of the following links:


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