10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations #minecraft #free #download

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10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

Oh no! Not another boring PowerPoint presentation! My eyes, my eyes .

How much does it suck to be in the audience for yet another drawn-out, boring, lifeless slideshow? Worse yet, how much does it such to be the one giving it?

The truth is, bad PowerPoint happens to good people, and quite often the person giving the presentation is just as much a victim as the poor sods listening to her or him.

Here are ten tips to help you add a little zing! to your next presentation. They are, of course, far from comprehensive, but they re a start. Feel free to share your own tips in the comments.

1. Write a script.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.

That s bass-ackwards. Since the point of your slides is to illustrate and expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should know what you intend to say and then figure out how to visualize it. Unless you are an expert at improvising, make sure you write out or at least outline your presentation before trying to put together slides.

And make sure your script follows good storytelling conventions: give it a beginning, middle, and end; have a clear arc that builds towards some sort of climax; make your audience appreciate each slide but be anxious to find out what s next; and when possible, always leave em wanting more.

2. One thing at a time, please.

At any given moment, what should be on the screen is the thing you re talking about. Our audience will almost instantly read every slide as soon as it s displayed; if you have the next four points you plan to make up there, they ll be three steps ahead of you, waiting for you to catch up rather than listening with interest to the point you re making.

Plan your presentation so just one new point is displayed at any given moment. Bullet points can be revealed one at a time as you reach them. Charts can be put on the next slide to be referenced when you get to the data the chart displays. Your job as presenter is to control the flow of information so that you and your audience stay in sync.

3. No paragraphs.

Where most presentations fail is that their authors, convinced they are producing some kind of stand-alone document, put everything they want to say onto their slides, in great big chunky blocks of text.

Congratulations. You ve just killed a roomful of people. Cause of death: terminal boredom poisoning.

Your slides are the illustrations for your presentation, not the presentation itself. They should underline and reinforce what you re saying as you give your presentation save the paragraphs of text for your script. PowerPoint and other presentation software have functions to display notes onto the presenter s screen that do not get sent to the projector, or you can use notecards, a separate word processor document, or your memory. Just don t put it on the screen and for goodness sake, if you do for some reason put it on the screen, don t stand with your back to your audience and read it from the screen!

4. Pay attention to design.

PowerPoint and other presentation packages offer all sorts of ways to add visual flash to your slides: fades, swipes, flashing text, and other annoyances are all too easy to insert with a few mouse clicks.

Avoid the temptation to dress up your pages with cheesy effects and focus instead on simple design basics:

  • Use a sans serif font for body text. Sans serifs like Arial, Helvetica, or Calibri tend to be the easiest to read on screens.
  • Use decorative fonts only for slide headers, and then only if they re easy to read. Decorative fonts calligraphy, German blackface, futuristic, psychotic handwriting, flowers, art nouveau, etc. are hard to read and should be reserved only for large headlines at the top of the page. Better yet, stick to a classy serif font like Georgia or Baskerville.
  • Put dark text on a light background. Again, this is easiest to read. If you must use a dark background for instance, if your company uses a standard template with a dark background make sure your text is quite light (white, cream, light grey, or pastels) and maybe bump the font size up two or three notches.
  • Align text left or right. Centered text is harder to read and looks amateurish. Line up all your text to a right-hand or left-hand baseline it will look better and be easier to follow.
  • Avoid clutter. A headline, a few bullet points, maybe an image anything more than that and you risk losing your audience as they sort it all out.

5. Use images sparingly

There are two schools of thought about images in presentations. Some say they add visual interest and keep audiences engaged; others say images are an unnecessary distraction.

Both arguments have some merit, so in this case the best option is to split the difference: use images only when they add important information or make an abstract point more concrete.

While we re on the subject, absolutely do not use PowerPoint s built-in clipart. Anything from Office 2003 and earlier has been seen by everyone in your audience a thousand times they ve become tired, used-up clich s, and I hopefully don t need to tell you to avoid tired, used-up clich s in your presentations. Office 2007 and non-Office programs have some clipart that isn t so familiar (though it will be, and soon) but by now, the entire concept of clipart has about run its course it just doesn t feel fresh and new anymore.

6. Think outside the screen.

Remember, the slides on the screen are only part of the presentation and not the main part. Even though you re liable to be presenting in a darkened room, give some thought to your own presentation manner how you hold yourself, what you wear, how you move around the room. You are the focus when you re presenting, no matter how interesting your slides are.

7. Have a hook.

Like the best writing, the best presentation shook their audiences early and then reel them in. Open with something surprising or intriguing, something that will get your audience to sit up and take notice. The most powerful hooks are often those that appeal directly to your audience s emotions offer them something awesome or, if it s appropriate, scare the pants off of them. The rest of your presentation, then, will be effectively your promise to make the awesome thing happen, or the scary thing not happen.

8. Ask questions.

Questions arouse interest, pique curiosity, and engage audiences. So ask a lot of them. Build tension by posing a question and letting your audience stew a moment before moving to the next slide with the answer. Quiz their knowledge and then show them how little they know. If appropriate, engage in a little question-and-answer with your audience, with you asking the questions.

9. Modulate, modulate, modulate.

Especially when you ve done a presentation before, it can be easy to fall into a drone, going on and on and on and on and on with only minimal changes to your inflection. Always speak as if you were speaking to a friend, not as if you are reading off of index cards (even if you are). If keeping up a lively and personable tone of voice is difficult for you when presenting, do a couple of practice run-throughs. If you still can t get it right and presentations are a big part of your job, take a public speaking course or join Toastmasters.

10. Break the rules.

As with everything else, there are times when each of these rules or any other rule you know won t apply. If you know there s a good reason to break a rule, go ahead and do it. Rule breaking is perfectly acceptable behavior it s ignoring the rules or breaking them because you just don t know any better that leads to shoddy boring presentations that lead to boredom, depression, psychopathic breaks, and eventually death. And you don t want that, do you?


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Substance De-addiction – Treatment Modalities – Alcoholism -Diseases and Conditions #counselling #and #psychotherapy, #pharmacotherapy, #self

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Drug abuse and dependence can be treated with levels of success comparable to those for other chronic conditions. Similarly to chronic diseases, such as diabetes or hypertension, the use of a combination of approaches (medications, behavioural changes, and health care for physical and psychological symptoms) during appropriate periods of time is needed to suit each individual’s needs and the severity of the problem at different stages of recovery.

There are many types of services for drug users that may be linked to provide a “continuum of care”. If there is integration between different interventions, clients are more likely to progress and move smoothly from one programme to another to become, and remain, drug-free.

Types of interventions

Early/brief interventions are designed to prevent the progression to problematic drug use by detecting persons who are using drugs in a potentially hazardous manner and helping them to stop or decrease use. This is best carried out within the primary care system by general practitioners, nurses and community workers.

Outreach, harm reduction and low-threshold interventions

Outreach, harm reduction and low-threshold interventions aim to reach drug users, build trust, provide basic living support, prevent or reduce negative health consequences associated with certain behaviours, and initiate a therapeutic process whenever the person is ready for it, without setting abstinence as an initial condition. In relation to drug injecting, ‘harm reduction’ components of comprehensive interventions aim to prevent transmission of HIV and other infections that occur through the sharing of non-sterile injection equipment and drug preparations.

Detoxification programmes help a person who is dependent on a psychoactive substance to cease use in a way that minimizes the symptoms of withdrawal and the risk of complications, sometimes using a prescribed medication. Detoxification alone has limited effectiveness and should be considered the starting point for other treatment interventions aimed at abstinence.

Counselling and psychotherapy

Counselling and psychotherapy form integral parts of most forms of treatment. They aim at initiating and maintaining behavioural and lifestyle changes, and help to control urges to use illicit substances.

Counselling is an intensive interpersonal process concerned with assisting people in

achieving their goals or functioning more effectively. It uses a variety of methodologies and techniques, including motivational interventions, cognitive-behavioural approaches (social skills training, stress management, anger management),

relapse prevention, provision of incentives, community reinforcement therapies

and family interventions. Psychotherapy is generally a longer-term process concerned with reconstruction of the person and larger changes in more fundamental psychological attributes, such as personality structure.

Pharmacotherapy involves the use of prescribed medications to support the patient in stabilizing his/her life and reducing or eliminating the use of a particular illicit substance. Two main types of pharmacological agents are administered for these purposes: substitution drugs, which are pharmacologically related to the drug producing dependence; and blocking agents, which do not have any psychotropic effects and block the effects of the substance(s) producing dependence.

Pharmacotherapies are often accompanied by psychological and other treatment.

Self help approaches aim at abstinence from alcohol and other drugs and are mostly organized around the 12-step programme of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or adaptations of that programme.

These programmes involve admitting one is powerless over one’s drinking/drug taking and over one’s life because of drinking/ drug taking, turning one’s life over to a ‘higher power’, making a moral inventory and amends for past wrongs, and offering to help other people with addiction problems.

Ancillary health and social services. Many patients also require other services, such as medical and mental health services, vocational training, employment and housing support, and legal advice.

As the patient progresses, the intensity of treatment decreases and the final part of treatment entails continuing individual and group support in order to prevent a return to substance use. Full rehabilitation and reintegration requires efforts at all levels of society.

Depending on the individual needs and problem severity, treatment interventions will take place in one of the following settings:

Community-based treatment is in a non-residential setting. Outpatient treatments (day attendance based services provided from a hospital) are often bracketed by community-based treatments. Examples of community-based treatments are opioid substitution programmes, counselling programmes and aftercare services.

Residential treatment programmes provide residential services on the same site as treatment services. The programmes generally strive to provide an environment free of substance abuse, with an expectation for compliance in a number of activities such as detoxification, assessment, information/education, counselling, group work, vocational training, and the development or recovery of social and lifeskills. Two main types of residential treatment are available: shorter term residential therapy (less than six months, including detoxification) and residential therapeutic community treatment (typically six to 12 months post-detoxification). Therapeutic communities are highly structured programmes focusing on the resocialization of the patient to a drug-free lifestyle, using the programme’s community as an active ingredient of treatment.

Institutional treatment, meaning drug treatment programmes in correctional institutions, can provide similar services to those available in the community with the aims ranging from a reduction of the health consequences, including HIV/ AIDS transmission, to the elimination of drug abuse and a reduction of criminal behaviours. The most successful programmes link to community-based programmes that continue treatment when the client returns to the community.

Reproduced with permission from: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

Copyright © 2004 UNODC, All Rights Reserved


Cost Effective SEO #cost #effective #seo, #organic #seo #services, #search #engine #optimization #specialist, #search #engine

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Do you need SEO for your website to help raise your monthly income by increasing your website s traffic? Are you feeling overwhelmed running between your normal day work and your online business? Don’t wait for your leg to break and spirit to get weary – hire a search engine optimization specialist (or SEO assistant)!

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Talk to us about the projects or tasks you need help. We find the skills and the person suited to your needs. You can speak, conference, and instruct us the same way you speak to your secretary in the office. A realtime report of the tasks will be submitted to you for your review and comments.

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10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations #nero #free

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10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

Oh no! Not another boring PowerPoint presentation! My eyes, my eyes .

How much does it suck to be in the audience for yet another drawn-out, boring, lifeless slideshow? Worse yet, how much does it such to be the one giving it?

The truth is, bad PowerPoint happens to good people, and quite often the person giving the presentation is just as much a victim as the poor sods listening to her or him.

Here are ten tips to help you add a little zing! to your next presentation. They are, of course, far from comprehensive, but they re a start. Feel free to share your own tips in the comments.

1. Write a script.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.

That s bass-ackwards. Since the point of your slides is to illustrate and expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should know what you intend to say and then figure out how to visualize it. Unless you are an expert at improvising, make sure you write out or at least outline your presentation before trying to put together slides.

And make sure your script follows good storytelling conventions: give it a beginning, middle, and end; have a clear arc that builds towards some sort of climax; make your audience appreciate each slide but be anxious to find out what s next; and when possible, always leave em wanting more.

2. One thing at a time, please.

At any given moment, what should be on the screen is the thing you re talking about. Our audience will almost instantly read every slide as soon as it s displayed; if you have the next four points you plan to make up there, they ll be three steps ahead of you, waiting for you to catch up rather than listening with interest to the point you re making.

Plan your presentation so just one new point is displayed at any given moment. Bullet points can be revealed one at a time as you reach them. Charts can be put on the next slide to be referenced when you get to the data the chart displays. Your job as presenter is to control the flow of information so that you and your audience stay in sync.

3. No paragraphs.

Where most presentations fail is that their authors, convinced they are producing some kind of stand-alone document, put everything they want to say onto their slides, in great big chunky blocks of text.

Congratulations. You ve just killed a roomful of people. Cause of death: terminal boredom poisoning.

Your slides are the illustrations for your presentation, not the presentation itself. They should underline and reinforce what you re saying as you give your presentation save the paragraphs of text for your script. PowerPoint and other presentation software have functions to display notes onto the presenter s screen that do not get sent to the projector, or you can use notecards, a separate word processor document, or your memory. Just don t put it on the screen and for goodness sake, if you do for some reason put it on the screen, don t stand with your back to your audience and read it from the screen!

4. Pay attention to design.

PowerPoint and other presentation packages offer all sorts of ways to add visual flash to your slides: fades, swipes, flashing text, and other annoyances are all too easy to insert with a few mouse clicks.

Avoid the temptation to dress up your pages with cheesy effects and focus instead on simple design basics:

  • Use a sans serif font for body text. Sans serifs like Arial, Helvetica, or Calibri tend to be the easiest to read on screens.
  • Use decorative fonts only for slide headers, and then only if they re easy to read. Decorative fonts calligraphy, German blackface, futuristic, psychotic handwriting, flowers, art nouveau, etc. are hard to read and should be reserved only for large headlines at the top of the page. Better yet, stick to a classy serif font like Georgia or Baskerville.
  • Put dark text on a light background. Again, this is easiest to read. If you must use a dark background for instance, if your company uses a standard template with a dark background make sure your text is quite light (white, cream, light grey, or pastels) and maybe bump the font size up two or three notches.
  • Align text left or right. Centered text is harder to read and looks amateurish. Line up all your text to a right-hand or left-hand baseline it will look better and be easier to follow.
  • Avoid clutter. A headline, a few bullet points, maybe an image anything more than that and you risk losing your audience as they sort it all out.

5. Use images sparingly

There are two schools of thought about images in presentations. Some say they add visual interest and keep audiences engaged; others say images are an unnecessary distraction.

Both arguments have some merit, so in this case the best option is to split the difference: use images only when they add important information or make an abstract point more concrete.

While we re on the subject, absolutely do not use PowerPoint s built-in clipart. Anything from Office 2003 and earlier has been seen by everyone in your audience a thousand times they ve become tired, used-up clich s, and I hopefully don t need to tell you to avoid tired, used-up clich s in your presentations. Office 2007 and non-Office programs have some clipart that isn t so familiar (though it will be, and soon) but by now, the entire concept of clipart has about run its course it just doesn t feel fresh and new anymore.

6. Think outside the screen.

Remember, the slides on the screen are only part of the presentation and not the main part. Even though you re liable to be presenting in a darkened room, give some thought to your own presentation manner how you hold yourself, what you wear, how you move around the room. You are the focus when you re presenting, no matter how interesting your slides are.

7. Have a hook.

Like the best writing, the best presentation shook their audiences early and then reel them in. Open with something surprising or intriguing, something that will get your audience to sit up and take notice. The most powerful hooks are often those that appeal directly to your audience s emotions offer them something awesome or, if it s appropriate, scare the pants off of them. The rest of your presentation, then, will be effectively your promise to make the awesome thing happen, or the scary thing not happen.

8. Ask questions.

Questions arouse interest, pique curiosity, and engage audiences. So ask a lot of them. Build tension by posing a question and letting your audience stew a moment before moving to the next slide with the answer. Quiz their knowledge and then show them how little they know. If appropriate, engage in a little question-and-answer with your audience, with you asking the questions.

9. Modulate, modulate, modulate.

Especially when you ve done a presentation before, it can be easy to fall into a drone, going on and on and on and on and on with only minimal changes to your inflection. Always speak as if you were speaking to a friend, not as if you are reading off of index cards (even if you are). If keeping up a lively and personable tone of voice is difficult for you when presenting, do a couple of practice run-throughs. If you still can t get it right and presentations are a big part of your job, take a public speaking course or join Toastmasters.

10. Break the rules.

As with everything else, there are times when each of these rules or any other rule you know won t apply. If you know there s a good reason to break a rule, go ahead and do it. Rule breaking is perfectly acceptable behavior it s ignoring the rules or breaking them because you just don t know any better that leads to shoddy boring presentations that lead to boredom, depression, psychopathic breaks, and eventually death. And you don t want that, do you?


Categories: News Tags: Tags: , , , , , ,

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations #free #online #music

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#free powerpoint

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10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

Oh no! Not another boring PowerPoint presentation! My eyes, my eyes .

How much does it suck to be in the audience for yet another drawn-out, boring, lifeless slideshow? Worse yet, how much does it such to be the one giving it?

The truth is, bad PowerPoint happens to good people, and quite often the person giving the presentation is just as much a victim as the poor sods listening to her or him.

Here are ten tips to help you add a little zing! to your next presentation. They are, of course, far from comprehensive, but they re a start. Feel free to share your own tips in the comments.

1. Write a script.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.

That s bass-ackwards. Since the point of your slides is to illustrate and expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should know what you intend to say and then figure out how to visualize it. Unless you are an expert at improvising, make sure you write out or at least outline your presentation before trying to put together slides.

And make sure your script follows good storytelling conventions: give it a beginning, middle, and end; have a clear arc that builds towards some sort of climax; make your audience appreciate each slide but be anxious to find out what s next; and when possible, always leave em wanting more.

2. One thing at a time, please.

At any given moment, what should be on the screen is the thing you re talking about. Our audience will almost instantly read every slide as soon as it s displayed; if you have the next four points you plan to make up there, they ll be three steps ahead of you, waiting for you to catch up rather than listening with interest to the point you re making.

Plan your presentation so just one new point is displayed at any given moment. Bullet points can be revealed one at a time as you reach them. Charts can be put on the next slide to be referenced when you get to the data the chart displays. Your job as presenter is to control the flow of information so that you and your audience stay in sync.

3. No paragraphs.

Where most presentations fail is that their authors, convinced they are producing some kind of stand-alone document, put everything they want to say onto their slides, in great big chunky blocks of text.

Congratulations. You ve just killed a roomful of people. Cause of death: terminal boredom poisoning.

Your slides are the illustrations for your presentation, not the presentation itself. They should underline and reinforce what you re saying as you give your presentation save the paragraphs of text for your script. PowerPoint and other presentation software have functions to display notes onto the presenter s screen that do not get sent to the projector, or you can use notecards, a separate word processor document, or your memory. Just don t put it on the screen and for goodness sake, if you do for some reason put it on the screen, don t stand with your back to your audience and read it from the screen!

4. Pay attention to design.

PowerPoint and other presentation packages offer all sorts of ways to add visual flash to your slides: fades, swipes, flashing text, and other annoyances are all too easy to insert with a few mouse clicks.

Avoid the temptation to dress up your pages with cheesy effects and focus instead on simple design basics:

  • Use a sans serif font for body text. Sans serifs like Arial, Helvetica, or Calibri tend to be the easiest to read on screens.
  • Use decorative fonts only for slide headers, and then only if they re easy to read. Decorative fonts calligraphy, German blackface, futuristic, psychotic handwriting, flowers, art nouveau, etc. are hard to read and should be reserved only for large headlines at the top of the page. Better yet, stick to a classy serif font like Georgia or Baskerville.
  • Put dark text on a light background. Again, this is easiest to read. If you must use a dark background for instance, if your company uses a standard template with a dark background make sure your text is quite light (white, cream, light grey, or pastels) and maybe bump the font size up two or three notches.
  • Align text left or right. Centered text is harder to read and looks amateurish. Line up all your text to a right-hand or left-hand baseline it will look better and be easier to follow.
  • Avoid clutter. A headline, a few bullet points, maybe an image anything more than that and you risk losing your audience as they sort it all out.

5. Use images sparingly

There are two schools of thought about images in presentations. Some say they add visual interest and keep audiences engaged; others say images are an unnecessary distraction.

Both arguments have some merit, so in this case the best option is to split the difference: use images only when they add important information or make an abstract point more concrete.

While we re on the subject, absolutely do not use PowerPoint s built-in clipart. Anything from Office 2003 and earlier has been seen by everyone in your audience a thousand times they ve become tired, used-up clich s, and I hopefully don t need to tell you to avoid tired, used-up clich s in your presentations. Office 2007 and non-Office programs have some clipart that isn t so familiar (though it will be, and soon) but by now, the entire concept of clipart has about run its course it just doesn t feel fresh and new anymore.

6. Think outside the screen.

Remember, the slides on the screen are only part of the presentation and not the main part. Even though you re liable to be presenting in a darkened room, give some thought to your own presentation manner how you hold yourself, what you wear, how you move around the room. You are the focus when you re presenting, no matter how interesting your slides are.

7. Have a hook.

Like the best writing, the best presentation shook their audiences early and then reel them in. Open with something surprising or intriguing, something that will get your audience to sit up and take notice. The most powerful hooks are often those that appeal directly to your audience s emotions offer them something awesome or, if it s appropriate, scare the pants off of them. The rest of your presentation, then, will be effectively your promise to make the awesome thing happen, or the scary thing not happen.

8. Ask questions.

Questions arouse interest, pique curiosity, and engage audiences. So ask a lot of them. Build tension by posing a question and letting your audience stew a moment before moving to the next slide with the answer. Quiz their knowledge and then show them how little they know. If appropriate, engage in a little question-and-answer with your audience, with you asking the questions.

9. Modulate, modulate, modulate.

Especially when you ve done a presentation before, it can be easy to fall into a drone, going on and on and on and on and on with only minimal changes to your inflection. Always speak as if you were speaking to a friend, not as if you are reading off of index cards (even if you are). If keeping up a lively and personable tone of voice is difficult for you when presenting, do a couple of practice run-throughs. If you still can t get it right and presentations are a big part of your job, take a public speaking course or join Toastmasters.

10. Break the rules.

As with everything else, there are times when each of these rules or any other rule you know won t apply. If you know there s a good reason to break a rule, go ahead and do it. Rule breaking is perfectly acceptable behavior it s ignoring the rules or breaking them because you just don t know any better that leads to shoddy boring presentations that lead to boredom, depression, psychopathic breaks, and eventually death. And you don t want that, do you?


Categories: News Tags: Tags: , , , , , ,

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations #free #mario #games

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#free powerpoint

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10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

Oh no! Not another boring PowerPoint presentation! My eyes, my eyes .

How much does it suck to be in the audience for yet another drawn-out, boring, lifeless slideshow? Worse yet, how much does it such to be the one giving it?

The truth is, bad PowerPoint happens to good people, and quite often the person giving the presentation is just as much a victim as the poor sods listening to her or him.

Here are ten tips to help you add a little zing! to your next presentation. They are, of course, far from comprehensive, but they re a start. Feel free to share your own tips in the comments.

1. Write a script.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.

That s bass-ackwards. Since the point of your slides is to illustrate and expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should know what you intend to say and then figure out how to visualize it. Unless you are an expert at improvising, make sure you write out or at least outline your presentation before trying to put together slides.

And make sure your script follows good storytelling conventions: give it a beginning, middle, and end; have a clear arc that builds towards some sort of climax; make your audience appreciate each slide but be anxious to find out what s next; and when possible, always leave em wanting more.

2. One thing at a time, please.

At any given moment, what should be on the screen is the thing you re talking about. Our audience will almost instantly read every slide as soon as it s displayed; if you have the next four points you plan to make up there, they ll be three steps ahead of you, waiting for you to catch up rather than listening with interest to the point you re making.

Plan your presentation so just one new point is displayed at any given moment. Bullet points can be revealed one at a time as you reach them. Charts can be put on the next slide to be referenced when you get to the data the chart displays. Your job as presenter is to control the flow of information so that you and your audience stay in sync.

3. No paragraphs.

Where most presentations fail is that their authors, convinced they are producing some kind of stand-alone document, put everything they want to say onto their slides, in great big chunky blocks of text.

Congratulations. You ve just killed a roomful of people. Cause of death: terminal boredom poisoning.

Your slides are the illustrations for your presentation, not the presentation itself. They should underline and reinforce what you re saying as you give your presentation save the paragraphs of text for your script. PowerPoint and other presentation software have functions to display notes onto the presenter s screen that do not get sent to the projector, or you can use notecards, a separate word processor document, or your memory. Just don t put it on the screen and for goodness sake, if you do for some reason put it on the screen, don t stand with your back to your audience and read it from the screen!

4. Pay attention to design.

PowerPoint and other presentation packages offer all sorts of ways to add visual flash to your slides: fades, swipes, flashing text, and other annoyances are all too easy to insert with a few mouse clicks.

Avoid the temptation to dress up your pages with cheesy effects and focus instead on simple design basics:

  • Use a sans serif font for body text. Sans serifs like Arial, Helvetica, or Calibri tend to be the easiest to read on screens.
  • Use decorative fonts only for slide headers, and then only if they re easy to read. Decorative fonts calligraphy, German blackface, futuristic, psychotic handwriting, flowers, art nouveau, etc. are hard to read and should be reserved only for large headlines at the top of the page. Better yet, stick to a classy serif font like Georgia or Baskerville.
  • Put dark text on a light background. Again, this is easiest to read. If you must use a dark background for instance, if your company uses a standard template with a dark background make sure your text is quite light (white, cream, light grey, or pastels) and maybe bump the font size up two or three notches.
  • Align text left or right. Centered text is harder to read and looks amateurish. Line up all your text to a right-hand or left-hand baseline it will look better and be easier to follow.
  • Avoid clutter. A headline, a few bullet points, maybe an image anything more than that and you risk losing your audience as they sort it all out.

5. Use images sparingly

There are two schools of thought about images in presentations. Some say they add visual interest and keep audiences engaged; others say images are an unnecessary distraction.

Both arguments have some merit, so in this case the best option is to split the difference: use images only when they add important information or make an abstract point more concrete.

While we re on the subject, absolutely do not use PowerPoint s built-in clipart. Anything from Office 2003 and earlier has been seen by everyone in your audience a thousand times they ve become tired, used-up clich s, and I hopefully don t need to tell you to avoid tired, used-up clich s in your presentations. Office 2007 and non-Office programs have some clipart that isn t so familiar (though it will be, and soon) but by now, the entire concept of clipart has about run its course it just doesn t feel fresh and new anymore.

6. Think outside the screen.

Remember, the slides on the screen are only part of the presentation and not the main part. Even though you re liable to be presenting in a darkened room, give some thought to your own presentation manner how you hold yourself, what you wear, how you move around the room. You are the focus when you re presenting, no matter how interesting your slides are.

7. Have a hook.

Like the best writing, the best presentation shook their audiences early and then reel them in. Open with something surprising or intriguing, something that will get your audience to sit up and take notice. The most powerful hooks are often those that appeal directly to your audience s emotions offer them something awesome or, if it s appropriate, scare the pants off of them. The rest of your presentation, then, will be effectively your promise to make the awesome thing happen, or the scary thing not happen.

8. Ask questions.

Questions arouse interest, pique curiosity, and engage audiences. So ask a lot of them. Build tension by posing a question and letting your audience stew a moment before moving to the next slide with the answer. Quiz their knowledge and then show them how little they know. If appropriate, engage in a little question-and-answer with your audience, with you asking the questions.

9. Modulate, modulate, modulate.

Especially when you ve done a presentation before, it can be easy to fall into a drone, going on and on and on and on and on with only minimal changes to your inflection. Always speak as if you were speaking to a friend, not as if you are reading off of index cards (even if you are). If keeping up a lively and personable tone of voice is difficult for you when presenting, do a couple of practice run-throughs. If you still can t get it right and presentations are a big part of your job, take a public speaking course or join Toastmasters.

10. Break the rules.

As with everything else, there are times when each of these rules or any other rule you know won t apply. If you know there s a good reason to break a rule, go ahead and do it. Rule breaking is perfectly acceptable behavior it s ignoring the rules or breaking them because you just don t know any better that leads to shoddy boring presentations that lead to boredom, depression, psychopathic breaks, and eventually death. And you don t want that, do you?


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10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations #free #cycle

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10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

Oh no! Not another boring PowerPoint presentation! My eyes, my eyes .

How much does it suck to be in the audience for yet another drawn-out, boring, lifeless slideshow? Worse yet, how much does it such to be the one giving it?

The truth is, bad PowerPoint happens to good people, and quite often the person giving the presentation is just as much a victim as the poor sods listening to her or him.

Here are ten tips to help you add a little zing! to your next presentation. They are, of course, far from comprehensive, but they re a start. Feel free to share your own tips in the comments.

1. Write a script.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.

That s bass-ackwards. Since the point of your slides is to illustrate and expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should know what you intend to say and then figure out how to visualize it. Unless you are an expert at improvising, make sure you write out or at least outline your presentation before trying to put together slides.

And make sure your script follows good storytelling conventions: give it a beginning, middle, and end; have a clear arc that builds towards some sort of climax; make your audience appreciate each slide but be anxious to find out what s next; and when possible, always leave em wanting more.

2. One thing at a time, please.

At any given moment, what should be on the screen is the thing you re talking about. Our audience will almost instantly read every slide as soon as it s displayed; if you have the next four points you plan to make up there, they ll be three steps ahead of you, waiting for you to catch up rather than listening with interest to the point you re making.

Plan your presentation so just one new point is displayed at any given moment. Bullet points can be revealed one at a time as you reach them. Charts can be put on the next slide to be referenced when you get to the data the chart displays. Your job as presenter is to control the flow of information so that you and your audience stay in sync.

3. No paragraphs.

Where most presentations fail is that their authors, convinced they are producing some kind of stand-alone document, put everything they want to say onto their slides, in great big chunky blocks of text.

Congratulations. You ve just killed a roomful of people. Cause of death: terminal boredom poisoning.

Your slides are the illustrations for your presentation, not the presentation itself. They should underline and reinforce what you re saying as you give your presentation save the paragraphs of text for your script. PowerPoint and other presentation software have functions to display notes onto the presenter s screen that do not get sent to the projector, or you can use notecards, a separate word processor document, or your memory. Just don t put it on the screen and for goodness sake, if you do for some reason put it on the screen, don t stand with your back to your audience and read it from the screen!

4. Pay attention to design.

PowerPoint and other presentation packages offer all sorts of ways to add visual flash to your slides: fades, swipes, flashing text, and other annoyances are all too easy to insert with a few mouse clicks.

Avoid the temptation to dress up your pages with cheesy effects and focus instead on simple design basics:

  • Use a sans serif font for body text. Sans serifs like Arial, Helvetica, or Calibri tend to be the easiest to read on screens.
  • Use decorative fonts only for slide headers, and then only if they re easy to read. Decorative fonts calligraphy, German blackface, futuristic, psychotic handwriting, flowers, art nouveau, etc. are hard to read and should be reserved only for large headlines at the top of the page. Better yet, stick to a classy serif font like Georgia or Baskerville.
  • Put dark text on a light background. Again, this is easiest to read. If you must use a dark background for instance, if your company uses a standard template with a dark background make sure your text is quite light (white, cream, light grey, or pastels) and maybe bump the font size up two or three notches.
  • Align text left or right. Centered text is harder to read and looks amateurish. Line up all your text to a right-hand or left-hand baseline it will look better and be easier to follow.
  • Avoid clutter. A headline, a few bullet points, maybe an image anything more than that and you risk losing your audience as they sort it all out.

5. Use images sparingly

There are two schools of thought about images in presentations. Some say they add visual interest and keep audiences engaged; others say images are an unnecessary distraction.

Both arguments have some merit, so in this case the best option is to split the difference: use images only when they add important information or make an abstract point more concrete.

While we re on the subject, absolutely do not use PowerPoint s built-in clipart. Anything from Office 2003 and earlier has been seen by everyone in your audience a thousand times they ve become tired, used-up clich s, and I hopefully don t need to tell you to avoid tired, used-up clich s in your presentations. Office 2007 and non-Office programs have some clipart that isn t so familiar (though it will be, and soon) but by now, the entire concept of clipart has about run its course it just doesn t feel fresh and new anymore.

6. Think outside the screen.

Remember, the slides on the screen are only part of the presentation and not the main part. Even though you re liable to be presenting in a darkened room, give some thought to your own presentation manner how you hold yourself, what you wear, how you move around the room. You are the focus when you re presenting, no matter how interesting your slides are.

7. Have a hook.

Like the best writing, the best presentation shook their audiences early and then reel them in. Open with something surprising or intriguing, something that will get your audience to sit up and take notice. The most powerful hooks are often those that appeal directly to your audience s emotions offer them something awesome or, if it s appropriate, scare the pants off of them. The rest of your presentation, then, will be effectively your promise to make the awesome thing happen, or the scary thing not happen.

8. Ask questions.

Questions arouse interest, pique curiosity, and engage audiences. So ask a lot of them. Build tension by posing a question and letting your audience stew a moment before moving to the next slide with the answer. Quiz their knowledge and then show them how little they know. If appropriate, engage in a little question-and-answer with your audience, with you asking the questions.

9. Modulate, modulate, modulate.

Especially when you ve done a presentation before, it can be easy to fall into a drone, going on and on and on and on and on with only minimal changes to your inflection. Always speak as if you were speaking to a friend, not as if you are reading off of index cards (even if you are). If keeping up a lively and personable tone of voice is difficult for you when presenting, do a couple of practice run-throughs. If you still can t get it right and presentations are a big part of your job, take a public speaking course or join Toastmasters.

10. Break the rules.

As with everything else, there are times when each of these rules or any other rule you know won t apply. If you know there s a good reason to break a rule, go ahead and do it. Rule breaking is perfectly acceptable behavior it s ignoring the rules or breaking them because you just don t know any better that leads to shoddy boring presentations that lead to boredom, depression, psychopathic breaks, and eventually death. And you don t want that, do you?


Categories: News Tags: Tags: , , , , , ,

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations #free #tax #return

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#free powerpoint

#

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

10 Tips for More Effective PowerPoint Presentations

Oh no! Not another boring PowerPoint presentation! My eyes, my eyes .

How much does it suck to be in the audience for yet another drawn-out, boring, lifeless slideshow? Worse yet, how much does it such to be the one giving it?

The truth is, bad PowerPoint happens to good people, and quite often the person giving the presentation is just as much a victim as the poor sods listening to her or him.

Here are ten tips to help you add a little zing! to your next presentation. They are, of course, far from comprehensive, but they re a start. Feel free to share your own tips in the comments.

1. Write a script.

A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in PowerPoint (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.

That s bass-ackwards. Since the point of your slides is to illustrate and expand what you are going to say to your audience. You should know what you intend to say and then figure out how to visualize it. Unless you are an expert at improvising, make sure you write out or at least outline your presentation before trying to put together slides.

And make sure your script follows good storytelling conventions: give it a beginning, middle, and end; have a clear arc that builds towards some sort of climax; make your audience appreciate each slide but be anxious to find out what s next; and when possible, always leave em wanting more.

2. One thing at a time, please.

At any given moment, what should be on the screen is the thing you re talking about. Our audience will almost instantly read every slide as soon as it s displayed; if you have the next four points you plan to make up there, they ll be three steps ahead of you, waiting for you to catch up rather than listening with interest to the point you re making.

Plan your presentation so just one new point is displayed at any given moment. Bullet points can be revealed one at a time as you reach them. Charts can be put on the next slide to be referenced when you get to the data the chart displays. Your job as presenter is to control the flow of information so that you and your audience stay in sync.

3. No paragraphs.

Where most presentations fail is that their authors, convinced they are producing some kind of stand-alone document, put everything they want to say onto their slides, in great big chunky blocks of text.

Congratulations. You ve just killed a roomful of people. Cause of death: terminal boredom poisoning.

Your slides are the illustrations for your presentation, not the presentation itself. They should underline and reinforce what you re saying as you give your presentation save the paragraphs of text for your script. PowerPoint and other presentation software have functions to display notes onto the presenter s screen that do not get sent to the projector, or you can use notecards, a separate word processor document, or your memory. Just don t put it on the screen and for goodness sake, if you do for some reason put it on the screen, don t stand with your back to your audience and read it from the screen!

4. Pay attention to design.

PowerPoint and other presentation packages offer all sorts of ways to add visual flash to your slides: fades, swipes, flashing text, and other annoyances are all too easy to insert with a few mouse clicks.

Avoid the temptation to dress up your pages with cheesy effects and focus instead on simple design basics:

  • Use a sans serif font for body text. Sans serifs like Arial, Helvetica, or Calibri tend to be the easiest to read on screens.
  • Use decorative fonts only for slide headers, and then only if they re easy to read. Decorative fonts calligraphy, German blackface, futuristic, psychotic handwriting, flowers, art nouveau, etc. are hard to read and should be reserved only for large headlines at the top of the page. Better yet, stick to a classy serif font like Georgia or Baskerville.
  • Put dark text on a light background. Again, this is easiest to read. If you must use a dark background for instance, if your company uses a standard template with a dark background make sure your text is quite light (white, cream, light grey, or pastels) and maybe bump the font size up two or three notches.
  • Align text left or right. Centered text is harder to read and looks amateurish. Line up all your text to a right-hand or left-hand baseline it will look better and be easier to follow.
  • Avoid clutter. A headline, a few bullet points, maybe an image anything more than that and you risk losing your audience as they sort it all out.

5. Use images sparingly

There are two schools of thought about images in presentations. Some say they add visual interest and keep audiences engaged; others say images are an unnecessary distraction.

Both arguments have some merit, so in this case the best option is to split the difference: use images only when they add important information or make an abstract point more concrete.

While we re on the subject, absolutely do not use PowerPoint s built-in clipart. Anything from Office 2003 and earlier has been seen by everyone in your audience a thousand times they ve become tired, used-up clich s, and I hopefully don t need to tell you to avoid tired, used-up clich s in your presentations. Office 2007 and non-Office programs have some clipart that isn t so familiar (though it will be, and soon) but by now, the entire concept of clipart has about run its course it just doesn t feel fresh and new anymore.

6. Think outside the screen.

Remember, the slides on the screen are only part of the presentation and not the main part. Even though you re liable to be presenting in a darkened room, give some thought to your own presentation manner how you hold yourself, what you wear, how you move around the room. You are the focus when you re presenting, no matter how interesting your slides are.

7. Have a hook.

Like the best writing, the best presentation shook their audiences early and then reel them in. Open with something surprising or intriguing, something that will get your audience to sit up and take notice. The most powerful hooks are often those that appeal directly to your audience s emotions offer them something awesome or, if it s appropriate, scare the pants off of them. The rest of your presentation, then, will be effectively your promise to make the awesome thing happen, or the scary thing not happen.

8. Ask questions.

Questions arouse interest, pique curiosity, and engage audiences. So ask a lot of them. Build tension by posing a question and letting your audience stew a moment before moving to the next slide with the answer. Quiz their knowledge and then show them how little they know. If appropriate, engage in a little question-and-answer with your audience, with you asking the questions.

9. Modulate, modulate, modulate.

Especially when you ve done a presentation before, it can be easy to fall into a drone, going on and on and on and on and on with only minimal changes to your inflection. Always speak as if you were speaking to a friend, not as if you are reading off of index cards (even if you are). If keeping up a lively and personable tone of voice is difficult for you when presenting, do a couple of practice run-throughs. If you still can t get it right and presentations are a big part of your job, take a public speaking course or join Toastmasters.

10. Break the rules.

As with everything else, there are times when each of these rules or any other rule you know won t apply. If you know there s a good reason to break a rule, go ahead and do it. Rule breaking is perfectly acceptable behavior it s ignoring the rules or breaking them because you just don t know any better that leads to shoddy boring presentations that lead to boredom, depression, psychopathic breaks, and eventually death. And you don t want that, do you?


Categories: News Tags: Tags: , , , , , ,